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Second Sunday Open House on May 13 Remembers Hudson WWI Veterans

Hudson resident Chris Bach spearheaded a group of Hudson residents to raise funds in order to make improvements to the memorial through a grant program, titled 100 Cities/100 Memorials to honor the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed In addition to restoring the monument, Bach is co-coordinating research of each of the names listed on the plaque.

Information about the project will be showcases from 1:00 to 4:00 at the free Open House. CBF handyman Clayte Woodworth is one of the names listed on the plaque.

WWI was a watershed in American history. The United States’ decision to join the battle on April 6, 1917 “to make the world safe for democracy” proved pivotal in securing the allied victory, a victory that would usher in the American Century. In the war’s aftermath, individuals, towns, cities and states all felt compelled to mark the war. Hudson was no exception.

Hudson’s surviving WWI Memorial is our most significant link to the war. The original plaque was installed on the west face/elevation of the Clock Tower. In the early 1930’s the plaque was moved to its current location, on the southeast corner of Main and Streetsboro Streets. Incorporated on top of the monument was a large bronze cannon. During the 1940’s, the 6- inch, 1300  pound German cannon was donated to the ‘Scrap Metal Drive” in WWII to be melted down.

The grant program is a partnership with the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. So far, only 50 memorials have been granted this award. Bach believes that the American Legion of Hudson initially raised the funds to purchase the plaque honoring 81 Hudson residents who fought in WWI. He is co-coordinating research on each person listed on the plaque. 

Previous Second Sunday Open Houses

Pesce Trailer
Open House
Pesce Trailer
Open House