Case Barlow Gardens

The 19th Century Kitchen Garden

When the Case-Barlow Farm was incorporated as a non-profit organization for the preservation of the farm, the Hudson Garden Club volunteered to create the Herb Garden near the farmhouse. Genevieve Jyurovat designed the garden. With research and physical labor, this exciting project became the botanical showcase that it is today.

The garden is divided into four quadrants with plantings that were important to the families living in the Western Reserve during the 19th century.

Southeast Corner--Herbs grown in the Culinary Garden such as sage, rosemary, lemon balm and savory would be used to flavor fresh and preserved foods and drinks.

Southwest Corner--The Medicinal Garden grew plants used to treat illness. Horehound soothed a sore throat, and chamomile soothed an upset stomach. These and other plants grown were gathered and made into teas, ointments and other remedies.

Northwest Corner--The Dye Garden features plants such as tansy, motherwort, joe-pye weed, dyer's broom, false indigo and our lady's bedstraw that would add color to homespun clothing.

Northeast Corner--The Cutting and Fragrance Garden has beautiful flowers both for fresh bouquets and to be dried for potpourri.

Surrounding the gardens is a cedar picket fence with a counter-weighted gate.

The 21st Century Community Garden

The back garden was started by the Hudson Montessori School 7th and 8th students as part of their North House Specialties Micro Economy study which involved researching, planting, harvest, and selling a finished product. Among the plants they cared for were grapes, berries, sunflowers and herbs.
Eventually, the gardens were planted on their school campus which facilitated easier access for students and teachers.

Today, volunteers have enlarged the area and have planted a large variety for vegetables, fruits and flowers. Watch for the garden stand on Barlow Road to purchase the freshest products from the garden.

Harrison Rose

When Emma Karla sees a beautiful rose, she likes to save it. By taking a cutting and rooting the prize specimen, she has a garden collection of her favorites.  When Emma and her daughter, Diane Dulzer, saw the Harrison Rose blooming at the CBF, Emma knew it was special.  Research showed that the rose was brought to New York City from Scotland, and then carried across the country with pioneers. A favorite rose of many, it is also known as the Yellow Rose of Texas.

 

 

Apple Orchard

For his Eagle Scout project, Miles VanBlarcum established an apple orchard at Case Barlow Farm in 2013. Five varieties of apple trees were selected being well suited for the farm’s soils and climate and will require easy care.

Several of his fellow scouts from BSA Troop 321 and friends from Western Reserve Academy joined Miles to cut away the sod, dig appropriate holes, place the bare root trees, backfill with soil, and water thoroughly:

Years ago, as a young student in Hudson Montessori School, Miles had worked in the gardens of the farm for community service and as part of the micro-economy of the middle school called “North House Specialties”.