American Beauty
1875
Beautiful globular buds open to large cupped flowers of deep, glowing pink with an excellent perfume. This rose blooms for us repeatedly, with a good display in spring and fall as well as a scattering of flowers during the summer. The tall, erect bush is quite vigorous once established and the canes are usually thornless.
4 to 6 feet Z5-9 R Fr
Autumn Damask
Prior to 1819
This is quite probably the plant that writers in antiquity described as the Four Seasons Rose of Paestum. It is the only one of the Old European roses to repeat its bloom, and some rosarians have suggested that it is a species hybrid with R. chinensis, created where the far edges of their ranges touch. Its garden value is undeniable, with richly fragrant flowers occurring in abundance on a compact, hardy shrub in spring, followed by scattered blossoms through the summer and fall. Light pink and double, this ruffled rose contains a good measure of Damask scent, possibly the finest perfume in the rose world.
4 to 5 feet Z5-9 R Fr
Baronne Prevost
1842
Large, flat and very double blossoms of a rich soft pink are highly fragrant. ‘Baronne Prévost’ blooms fairly often during the growing season on a chunky, erect shrub. It is one of the most rewarding Hybrid Perpetuals in the garden, resembling the famous ‘Paul Neyron’, but has a slightly smaller flower and is more remontant.
4 to 5 feet Z5-9 R Fr
Calocarpa
Prior to 1891
Thought to be a cross between R. rugosa and some form of R. chinensis, ‘Calocarpa’ blooms with large single-petaled, fragrant flowers of a rich rose-pink. This is a good choice for a tall hedge in the six to eight foot range. An abundant crop of showy, pendulous hips will decorate the bush in fall and winter.
Cecile Brunner
1881
Perfectly shaped, little pink buds earned Cecile Brunner its nickname, “The Sweetheart Rose.” It is a treasure and should be in every garden where it will bloom from mid-Spring until frost. The bush form remains compact, putting up sprays of lightly fragrant flowers that look like tiny, high-centered Hybrid Teas. Long lived and healthy, Cecile Brunner tolerates everything from poor soil to partial shade .
3 to 4 feet Z5-9 R Fr
Duke of Edinburgh
1868
This rose well illustrates the effect environment can have, as well as the vagaries of the observer. Peter Beales of England observes that ‘Duke of Edinburgh’ is “shortish in stature and slightly spreading in habit.” By way of contrast, Trevor Griffiths of New Zealand, admires it as “an upright tall, attractive plant.” Here in Texas, we have observed the plant to be moderate in growth, sturdy in habit, and lovely in bloom. We should add that all agree that this rose is extremely fragrant.
4 to 6 feet Z5-9 R F
General Jacqueminot
1853
The prototype of the Hybrid Perpetual class and the first long stemmed florists’ rose, ‘General Jacqueminot’ has shapely, very fragrant flowers of dark red with a whitish reverse. The sturdy blooms appear to advantage on a vigorous, erect bush with rich green foliage.
4 to 6 feet Z5-9 R Fr
Kazanlik
Prior to 1850
Perhaps the most sought after of Damask roses, Kazanlik or Trigintipetala is grown in quantity in Bulgaria, a country which still exports a great deal of the worlds rose attar. The flowers are deep pink, with thirty petals arranged in a somewhat shaggy halo around golden stamens. The dark green shrub is vigorous and not as open as in some varieties of Damasks.
3 to 5 feet Z5-9 OFr

6 to 8 feet Z4-9 OFr H Madame Plantier
1835
Thought to be the product of an Alba rose crossed with R. moschata, ‘Mme. Plantier’ is a perfect subject for the white garden. The flat, very double blooms are borne in clusters on a spreading, bushy plant all through the spring. The clusters of medium-sized, double, white flowers have a green eye, the outer petals reflexing back in a most attractive manner. Alba roses do best if pruned back a little to encourage bushy growth, and they are famous for the sweetness of their scent.
4 to 6 feet Z4-9 OFr w
Marchesa Boccella
1842
A mild confusion surrounds this rose, since it is apparently the same plant that was also sold much later under the name Jacques Cartier. Marchesa Boccella is in constant bloom for us, one of the few members of the class to justify the “perpetual” in its name. The delicate pink flowers are flat, petal-crowded confections that sit in clusters of three atop healthy, jade green foliage.
3 to 5 feet Z5-9 R Fr
Mrs. Anthony Waterer
1898
Mrs. Anthony Waterer is a hybrid of R. rugosa and the popular old Hybrid Perpetual, General Jacqueminot. The combination has produced an intensely fragrant rose of deep crimson. The bush is broad and solid with plenty of prickles and dark green, deeply veined leaves.
3 to 6 feet Z4-9 R Fr
Paul Neyron
1869
If your grandmother mentioned “cabbage roses”, this is probably the rose she meant. The fragrant, rich pink flowers can be 6 or 7 inches wide. Even though ‘Paul Neyron’ is no relation to the true ‘Cabbage Rose’, R. centifolia, it has the wonderful fullness associated with the term, Cabbage Rose. The growth habit tends to be linear, so place it towards the back of the flower bed.
4 to 6 feet Z5-9 R Fr

Perle dOr
1884
This dainty little rose has a powerful perfume that can scent an entire room. Buds that are similar to ‘Cécile Brünner’ change from nearly orange to golden pink as they unfold in small clusters. The silky petals curl back neatly upon opening into a delicate pompon shape. Foliage is a soft apple green, healthy, and full on a plant that is seldom out of bloom.
3 to 4 feet Z5-9 R Fr ab
Vicks Caprice
1891
Mr. Vick found this striped flower sport on a ‘Archiduchess Elisabeth d’Autriche’ in his Rochester, New York garden in 1891. Its flowers are large, fully double and cupped. Its most remarkable feature is the floral coloration – an irregular striping of soft pink and lilac with random flecks of white. Like its parent, it has an upright habit, soft green foliage, few thorns and an excellent fragrance. This rose is an ideal cut flower and adds interest to any floral arrangement.
3 to 4 feet Z5-9 R Fr